domingo, 15 de junho de 2014

O fim da guerra à gordura - reportagem da revista TIME

Segue, abaixo, a íntegra da reportagem de capa da revista TIME dessa semana, encerrando o ciclo de 30 anos de orientação nutricional equivocada.

P.S.: A versão traduzida está aqui: http://www.paleodiario.com/2014/06/revista-time-terminando-guerra-gordura.html





Ending the War on Fat

Bryan Walsh

For decades, it has been the most vilified nutrient in the American diet. But new science reveals fat isn’t what’s hurting our health





The taste of my childhood was the taste of skim milk. We spread bright yellow margarine on dinner rolls, ate low-fat microwave oatmeal flavored with apples and cinnamon, put nonfat ranch on our salads. We were only doing what we were told. In 1977, the year before I was born, a Senate committee led by George McGovern published its landmark “Dietary Goals for the United States,” urging Americans to eat less high-fat red meat, eggs and dairy and replace them with more calories from fruits, vegetables and especially carbohydrates.

By 1980 that wisdom was codified. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued its first dietary guidelines, and one of the primary directives was to avoid cholesterol and fat of all sorts. The National Institutes of Health recommended that all Americans over the age of 2 cut fat consumption, and that same year the government announced the results of a $150 million study, which had a clear message: Eat less fat and cholesterol to reduce your risk of a heart attack.

The food industry–and American eating habits–jumped in step. Grocery shelves filled with “light” yogurts, low-fat microwave dinners, cheese-flavored crackers, cookies. Families like mine followed the advice: beef disappeared from the dinner plate, eggs were replaced at breakfast with cereal or yolk-free beaters, and whole milk almost wholly vanished. From 1977 to 2012, per capita consumption of those foods dropped while calories from supposedly healthy carbohydrates increased–no surprise, given that breads, cereals and pasta were at the base of the USDA food pyramid.

We were embarking on a “vast nutritional experiment,” as the skeptical president of the National Academy of Sciences, Philip Handler, put it in 1980. But with nearly a million Americans a year dropping dead from heart disease by the mid-’80s, we had to try something.

Nearly four decades later, the results are in: the experiment was a failure. We cut the fat, but by almost every measure, Americans are sicker than ever. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes increased 166% from 1980 to 2012. Nearly 1 in 10 American adults has the disease, costing the health care system $245 billion a year, and an estimated 86 million people are prediabetic. Deaths from heart disease have fallen–a fact that many experts attribute to better emergency care, less smoking and widespread use of cholesterol- controlling drugs like statins–but cardiovascular disease remains the country’s No. 1 killer. Even the increasing rates of exercise haven’t been able to keep us healthy. More than a third of the country is now obese, making the U.S. one of the fattest countries in an increasingly fat world. “Americans were told to cut back on fat to lose weight and prevent heart disease,” says Dr. David Ludwig, the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. “There’s an overwhelmingly strong case to be made for the opposite.”

But making that case is controversial, despite the evidence to support it. The vilification of fat is now deeply embedded in our culture, with its love-hate relationship with food and its obsession over weight. It has helped reshape vast swaths of agriculture, as acre upon acre of subsidized corn was planted to produce the sweeteners that now fill processed foods. It has changed business, with the market for fat replacers–the artificial ingredients that take the place of fat in packaged food–growing by nearly 6% a year. It’s even changed the way we talk, attaching moral terms to nutrients in debates over “bad” cholesterol vs. “good” cholesterol and “bad” fat vs. “good” fat.

All of this means the received wisdom is not going to change quietly. “This is a huge paradigm shift in science,” says Dr. Eric Westman, the director of the Duke Lifestyle Medicine Clinic, who works with patients on ultra-low-carb diets. “But the studies to support it do exist.”

Research that challenges the idea that fat makes people fat and is a dire risk factor for heart disease is mounting. And the stakes are high–for researchers, for public-health agencies and for average people who simply want to know what to put in their mouth three times a day.

We have known for some time that fats found in vegetables like olives and in fish like salmon can actually protect against heart disease. Now it’s becoming clear that even the saturated fat found in a medium-rare steak or a slab of butter–public-health enemies Nos. 1 and 2–has a more complex and, in some cases, benign effect on the body than previously thought. Our demonization of fat may have backfired in ways we are just beginning to understand. When Americans cut back, the calories from butter and beef and cheese didn’t simply disappear. “The thinking went that if people reduced saturated fat, they would replace it with healthy fruits and vegetables,” says Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. “Well, that was naive.”

New research suggests that it’s the overconsumption of carbohydrates, sugar and sweeteners that is chiefly responsible for the epidemics of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Refined carbohydrates–like those in “wheat” bread, hidden sugar, low-fat crackers and pasta–cause changes in our blood chemistry that encourage the body to store the calories as fat and intensify hunger, making it that much more difficult to lose weight. “The argument against fat was totally and completely flawed,” says Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatrician at the University of California, San Francisco, and the president of the Institute for Responsible Nutrition. “We’ve traded one disease for another.”

The myopic focus on fat has warped our diet and contributed to the biggest health crises facing the country. It’s time to end the war.

The Fat Man

We have long been told that fewer calories and more exercise leads to weight loss. And we want to believe that science is purely a matter of data–that superior research will always yield the right answer. But sometimes research is no match for a strong personality. No one better embodies that than Dr. Ancel Keys, the imperious physiologist who laid the groundwork for the fight against fat. Keys first made his name during World War II, when he was asked by the Army to develop what would become known as the K ration, the imperishable food supplies carried by troops into the field. It was in the following years that the fear of heart disease exploded in the U.S., driven home by President Dwight Eisenhower’s heart attack in 1955. That year, nearly half of all deaths in the U.S. were due to heart disease, and many of the victims were seemingly healthy men struck down suddenly by a heart attack. “There was an enormous fear overtaking the country,” says Nina Teicholz, author of the new book The Big Fat Surprise. “The heart-disease epidemic seemed to be emerging out of nowhere.”

Keys had an explanation. He posited that high levels of cholesterol–a waxy, fatlike substance present in some foods as well as naturally occurring in the body–would clog arteries, leading to heart disease. He had a solution as well. Since fat intake raised LDL cholesterol, he reasoned that reducing fat in the diet could reduce the risk of heart attacks. (LDL cholesterol levels are considered a marker for heart disease, while high HDL cholesterol seems to be cardioprotective.) In the 1950s and ’60s, Keys sought to flesh out that hypothesis, traveling around the world to gather data about diet and cardiovascular disease. His landmark Seven Countries Study found that people who ate a diet low in saturated fat had lower levels of heart disease. The Western diet, heavy on meat and dairy, correlated with high rates of heart disease. That study helped land Keys in 1961 on the cover of TIME, in which he admonished Americans to reduce the fat calories in their diet by a third if they wanted to avoid heart disease. That same year, following Keys’ strong urging, the American Heart Association (AHA) advised Americans for the first time to cut down on saturated fat. “People should know the facts,” Keys told TIME. “Then if they want to eat themselves to death, let them.”

Keys’ work became the foundation for a body of science implicating fat as a major risk factor for heart disease. The Seven Countries Study has been referenced close to 1 million times. The vilification of fat also fit into emerging ideas about weight control, which focused on calories in vs. calories out. “Everyone assumed it was all about the calories,” says Lustig. And since fat contains more calories per gram than protein or carbohydrates, the thinking was that if we removed fat, the calories would follow.

That’s what Keys, who died in 2004, believed, and now it’s what most Americans believe too. But Keys’ research had problems from the start. He cherry-picked his data, leaving out countries like France and West Germany that had high-fat diets but low rates of heart disease. Keys highlighted the Greek island of Crete, where almost no cheese or meat was eaten and people lived to an old age with clear arteries. But Keys visited Crete in the years following World War II, when the island was still recovering from German occupation and the diet was artificially lean. Even more confusing, Greeks on the neighboring isle of Corfu ate far less saturated fat than Cretans yet had much higher rates of heart disease. “It was highly flawed,” says Dr. Peter Attia, the president and director of the Nutrition Science Initiative, an independent obesity-research center. “It was not on the level of epidemiology work today.”

Keys’ unshakable confidence and his willingness to take down any researcher who disagreed with him was at least as important as his massive data sets. (When the biostatistician Jacob Yerushalmy published a 1957 paper questioning the causal relationship between fat and heart disease, Keys responded sharply in print, claiming that Yerushalmy’s data was badly flawed.) Keys’ research also played into a prevailing narrative that Americans had once eaten a largely plant-based diet before shifting in the 20th century to meals rich in red meat. Heart disease followed, as if we were being punished for our dietary sins.

The reality is that hard numbers about the American diet are scant before midcentury and all but nonexistent before 1900. Historical records suggest Americans were always voracious omnivores, feasting on the plentiful wild game available throughout the country. In his book Putting Meat on the American Table, the historian Roger Horowitz concludes that the average American in the 19th century ate 150 to 200 lb. of meat per year–in line with what we eat now.

But the antifat message went mainstream, and by the 1980s it was so embedded in modern medicine and nutrition that it became nearly impossible to challenge the consensus. Dr. Walter Willett, now the head of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, tells me that in the mid-1990s, he was sitting on a piece of contrary evidence that none of the leading American science journals would publish. “There was a strong belief that saturated fat was the cause of heart disease, and there was resistance to anything that questioned it,” Willett says. “It turned out to be more nuanced than that.” He had been running a long-term epidemiological study that followed the diets and heart health of more than 40,000 middle-aged men. Willett found that if his subjects replaced foods high in saturated fat with carbohydrates, they experienced no reduction in heart disease. Willett eventually published his research in the British Medical Journal in 1996.

In part because of Willett’s work, the conversation around fat began to change. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats–the kind found in some vegetables and fish–were found to be beneficial to heart health. The Mediterranean diet, rich in fish, nuts, vegetables and olive oil, surged in popularity. And it’s worth noting that the Mediterranean diet isn’t low in total fat–not at all. Up to 40% of its calories come from poly- and monounsaturated fat. Today, medical groups like the Mayo Clinic embrace this diet for patients worried about heart health, and even the fat-phobic AHA has become receptive to it. “There is growing evidence that the Mediterranean diet is a pretty healthy way to eat,” says Dr. Rose Marie Robertson, the chief science officer of the AHA.

But what about saturated fat? Here, the popular wisdom has been harder to change. The 2010 USDA dietary guidelines recommend that Americans get less than 10% of their daily calories from saturated fat–the equivalent of half a pan-broiled hamburger minus the cheese, bacon and mayo it’s often dressed with. The AHA is even stricter: Americans over the age of 2 should limit saturated-fat intake to less than 7% of calories, and the 70 million Americans who would benefit from lowering cholesterol should keep it under 6% of calories–equal to about two slices of cheddar per day. Some experts say they just aren’t comfortable letting saturated fat off the hook. “When you replace saturated fats with polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, you lower LDL cholesterol,” says Dr. Robert Eckel, a past president of the AHA and a co-author of the group’s recent guidelines. “That’s all I need to know.”

But that’s not the full picture. The more we learn about fat, the more complex its effects on the body appear.

The Truth About Fat 

The idea that saturated fat is bad for us makes a kind of instinctive sense, and not just because we use the same phrase to describe both the greasy stuff that gives our steak flavor and the pounds we carry around our middles. Chemically, they’re not all that different. The fats that course through our blood and accumulate on our bellies are called triglycerides, and high levels of triglycerides have been linked to heart disease. It doesn’t take much of an imaginative leap to assume that eating fats would make us fat, clog our arteries and give us heart disease. “It sounds like common sense–you are what you eat,” says Dr. Stephen Phinney, a nutritional biochemist who has studied low-carb diets for years.

But when scientists crunch the numbers, the connection between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease becomes more tenuous. A 2010 meta-analysis–basically a study of other studies–concluded that there was no significant evidence that saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Those results were echoed by another meta-analysis published in March in the Annals of Internal Medicine that drew on nearly 80 studies involving more than half a million subjects. A team led by Dr. Rajiv Chowdhury, a cardiovascular epidemiologist at Cambridge University, concluded that current evidence does not support low consumption of saturated fats or high consumption of the polyunsaturated fats that are often considered heart healthy. Though the authors came under criticism for the way they evaluated the evidence, they stand behind the conclusion, noting that the aim of their study is to show the need for more research. “The main message is that there’s a lot more work that needs to be done,” says Chowdhury.

Given that the case on saturated fat was long considered closed, even calls to re-examine the evidence mark a serious change. But if the new thinking about saturated fats is surprising, it may be because we’ve misunderstood what meat and dairy do to our bodies. It’s incontrovertibly true that saturated fat will raise LDL-cholesterol levels, which are associated with higher rates of heart disease. That’s the most damning biological evidence against saturated fat. But cholesterol is more complicated than that. Saturated fat also raises levels of the so-called good HDL cholesterol, which removes the LDL cholesterol that can accumulate on arterial walls. Raising both HDL and LDL makes saturated fat a cardio wash.

Plus, scientists now know there are two kinds of LDL particles: small, dense ones and large, fluffy ones. The large ones seem to be mostly harmless–and it’s the levels of those large particles that fat intake raises. Carb intake, meanwhile, seems to increase the small, sticky particles that now appear linked to heart disease. “Those observations led me to wonder how strong the evidence was for the connection between saturated fat and heart disease,” says Dr. Ronald Krauss, a cardiologist and researcher who has done pioneering work on LDL. “There’s a risk that people have been steered in the wrong direction by using LDL cholesterol rather than LDL particles as a risk factor.”

It’s important to understand that there’s no such thing as a placebo in a diet study. When we reduce levels of one nutrient, we have to replace it with something else, which means researchers are always studying nutrients in relation to one another. It’s also important to understand that the new science doesn’t mean people should double down on cheeseburgers or stir large amounts of butter into their morning coffee, as do some adherents of ultra-low-carb diets. While saturated fat increasingly seems to have at worst a neutral effect on obesity and heart disease, other forms of fat may be more beneficial. There’s evidence that omega-3s, the kind of fat found in flaxseed and salmon, can protect against heart disease. A 2013 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that a diet rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats significantly reduced the risk of major cardiovascular events.

And there is variety even within the category of saturated fats. A 2012 study found that fats in dairy–now the source from which Americans get most of their saturated fat–seem to be more protective than the fats found in meat. “The main issue here is comparative,” says Dr. Frank Hu, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. “What are you comparing saturated fat to?”



The Unintended Diet

The food industry is nothing if not inventive. Faced with a fatwa against fat in the 1980s, manufacturers adjusted, lining grocery shelves with low-fat cookies, crackers and cakes. The thinking for consumers was simple: Fat is dangerous, and this product has no fat; therefore it must be healthy. This was the age of SnackWells, the brand of low-fat cookies introduced by Nabisco in 1992 that within two years had surpassed the venerable Ritz cracker to become the No. 1 snack in the nation. But without fat, something had to be added, and Americans wound up making a dangerous trade. “We just cut fat and added a whole lot of low-fat junk food that increased caloric intake,” says Dr. David Katz, the founding director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. “It was a diet of unintended consequences.

Those consequences have been severe. From 1971 to 2000, the percentage of calories from carbohydrates increased nearly 15%, while the share of calories from fat fell–in line with expert recommendations. In 1992, the USDA recommended up to 11 servings a day of grains, compared with just two to three servings of meat, eggs, nuts, beans and fish combined. School districts across the country have banned whole milk, yet sweetened chocolate milk remains on the menu as long as it’s low-fat.

The idea here was in part to cut calories, but Americans actually ended up eating more: 2,586 calories a day in 2010 compared with 2,109 a day in 1970. Over that same period, calories from flour and cereals went up 42%, and obesity and Type 2 diabetes became veritable epidemics. “It’s undeniable we’ve gone down the wrong path,” says Jeff Volek, a physiologist at the University of Connecticut.

It can be hard to understand why a diet heavy on refined carbs can lead to obesity and diabetes. It has to do with blood chemistry. Simple carbs like bread and corn may not look like sugar on your plate, but in your body, that’s what they’re converted to when digested. “A bagel is no different than a bag of Skittles to your body,” says Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, the incoming dean of nutrition science at Tufts University.

Those sugars stimulate the production of insulin, which causes fat cells to go into storage overdrive, leading to weight gain. Since fewer calories are left to fuel the body, we begin to feel hungry, and metabolism begins to slow in an effort to save energy. We eat more and gain more weight, never feeling full. “Hunger is the death knell of a weight-loss program,” says Duke’s Westman. “A low-fat, low-calorie diet doesn’t work.” Because as this process repeats, our cells become more resistant to insulin, which causes us to gain more weight, which only increases insulin resistance in a vicious circle. Obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high triglycerides and low HDL can all follow–and fat intake is barely involved. All calories, it turns out, are not created equal. “When we focus on fat, carbohydrates inevitably increase,” says Ludwig, who co-wrote a recent JAMA commentary on the subject. “You wouldn’t give lactose to people who are lactose intolerant, yet we give carbs to people who are carb intolerant.”

Ultra-low-carb diets have come in and out of vogue since Dr. Robert Atkins first began promoting his version nearly 50 years ago. (It has never been popular with mainstream medicine; the American Diabetic Association once referred to the Atkins diet as a “nutritionist’s nightmare.”) Studies by Westman found that replacing carbohydrates with fat could help manage and even reverse diabetes. A 2008 study in the New England Journal of Medicine that looked at more than 300 subjects who tried either a low-fat, a low-carb or a Mediterranean-style diet found that people on the low-fat diet lost less weight than those on the low-carb or Mediterranean diet, both of which feature high amounts of fat. Those results aren’t surprising–study after study has found that it’s very difficult to lose weight on a very low-fat diet, possibly because fat and meat can produce a sense of satiety that’s harder to achieve with carbs, making it easier to simply stop eating.

Not every expert agrees. Dr. Dean Ornish, founder of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute, whose low-fat, almost vegan diet has been shown in one study to reverse arterial blockage, worries that an increase in animal-protein consumption can come with health problems of its own, pointing to studies that link red meat in particular to higher rates of colon cancer. There’s also the uncomfortable fact that meat, especially beef, has an outsize impact on the planet. Nearly a third of the earth’s total ice-free surface is used in one way or another to raise livestock. Even if eating more fat is better for us–which Ornish doesn’t believe–it could carry serious environmental consequences if it leads to a major increase in meat consumption. “These studies just tell people what they want to hear,” says Ornish. “There’s a reductionist tendency to look for the one magic bullet.”

The war over fat is far from over. Consumer habits are deeply formed, and entire industries are based on demonizing fat. TV teems with reality shows about losing weight. The aisles are still filled with low-fat snacks. Most of us still feel a twinge of shame when we gobble down a steak. And publishing scientific research that contradicts or questions what we have long been told about saturated fat can be as difficult now as it was for Willett in the ’90s. Even experts like Harvard’s Hu, who says people shouldn’t be concerned about total fat, draw the line at fully exonerating saturated fat. “I do worry that if people get the message that saturated fat is fine, they’ll [adopt] unhealthy habits,” he says. “We should be focusing on the quality of food, of real food.”

Nearly every expert agrees we’d be healthier if more of our diet were made up of what the writer Michael Pollan bluntly calls “real food.” The staggering rise in obesity over the past few decades doesn’t just stem from refined carbohydrates messing with our metabolism. More and more of what we eat comes to us custom-designed by the food industry to make us want more. There’s evidence that processing itself raises the danger posed by food. Studies suggest that processed meat may increase the risk of heart disease in a way that unprocessed meat does not.

How we eat–whether we cook it ourselves or grab fast-food takeout–matters as much as what we eat. So don’t feel bad about the cream in your coffee or the yolks in your eggs or the occasional steak with béarnaise if you’ve got the culinary chops–but don’t think that the end of the war on fat means all the Extra Value Meals you can eat. As Katz puts it, “the cold hard truth is that the only way to eat well is to eat well.” Which, I’m thankful to note, doesn’t have to include skim milk.

This appears in the June 23, 2014 issue of TIME.

274 comentários:

  1. Doutor, a política de privacidade da Time permite o senhor replicar este conteúdo? Digo isso porque existem sites, como a Andandtech, que não permitem. De qualquer jeito, obrigado por compartilhar esta matéria!

    ResponderExcluir
  2. Não, não permite. Se reclamarem, eu tiro ;-)
    Em 15/06/2014 14:28, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  3. Doutor Souto, poderia me dizer sua opinião no que tem de verdade, mentiras e/ou exageros na questão ambiental de criação de animais para consumo humano? Como pode ser vista neste trecho:

    "There’s also the uncomfortable fact that meat, especially beef, has an outsize impact on the planet. Nearly a third of the earth’s total ice-free surface is used in one way or another to raise livestock. Even if eating more fat is better for us–which Ornish doesn’t believe–it could carry serious environmental consequences if it leads to a major increase in meat consumption"

    ResponderExcluir
  4. =(

    http://portugalmundial.com/2014/03/onu-recomenda-mudanca-global-para-dieta-sem-carne-e-sem-laticinios/

    ResponderExcluir
  5. Poly,

    assista : http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2013/06/herbivoros-e-desertificacao.html

    leia: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com/2013/03/prezado-dr-souto-paelofantasia.html

    ResponderExcluir
  6. Para quem não lê inglês: http://www.paleodiario.com/2014/06/revista-time-terminando-guerra-gordura.html

    ResponderExcluir
  7. Eu tenho até vontade de chorar quando vejo seus links traduzidos...rs.
    Muitíssimo obrigada! Rs

    ResponderExcluir
  8. Hahaha. Chore não...

    ResponderExcluir
  9. Doutor Souto, sou iniciante nesse modo de vida, low carb Paleo, por isso tenho algumas dúvidas. O senhor poderia elencar quais os erros mais comuns que um iniciante comete da dieta Paleo?

    ResponderExcluir
  10. http://www.paleodiario.com/2013/11/lchf-para-iniciantes.html

    ResponderExcluir
  11. Infelizmente alguns profissionais não conseguirão enxergar o óbvio. Outro dia vi na TV uma nutricionista falando uma das maiores bobagens dos últimos tempos. Ela disse que ao comer carnes devemos evitar as partes com ossos pois nessas regiões se acumula mais gordura. Ahhhh... que raiva me deu!! rsrs

    ResponderExcluir
  12. Fantásticas as suas traduções!! Obrigada!

    ResponderExcluir
  13. Também adoro suas traduções. Tanks!!!!

    ResponderExcluir
  14. Gustavo Borgonovi16 de junho de 2014 19:24

    Vários vegans comemorando... mas gostei de um comentário contra lá, vou até reproduzi-lo aqui:

    "

    1º - O relatório é sobre produção pecuária e NÃO sobre vegetarianismo.
    2ª - O tubo digestivo dos seres humanos NÃO é herbívoro ou frugívoro.
    3º - O Homo Sapiens sempre ingeriu alimentos de origem animal.
    4º - Não há registo de sociedades antigas ou de antepassados vegetarianos, aliás quanto mais atrás se vá nos restos arqueológicos mais isso é óbvio.
    5º - A alimentação vegetariana é a mais artificial da História.
    6º - O carnivorismo é natural e normal há centenas de milhões de anos e milhões de espécies sobreviveram graças a serem carnívoras.
    7º - O vegetarianismo ou o veganismo NÃO se baseiam em Ciência mas são sistemas de crenças, como se pode comprovar pelas justificações que aqui se lêem.
    8º - Justificar o vegetarianismo com documentos Essénios é um problema de crança pessoal.
    9º - A Ciência Histórica faz-se cruzando informações diversas para se tentar chegar a algo próximo da verdade: quando existem mais registos num determinado sentido, do que noutro, assume-se que o que tiver mais registos é o verdadeiro.
    10º - O Jesus Histórico nunca foi considerado vegetariano, pois para além de comer peixe com os Apóstolos pescadores, ele fazia o que os outros Judeus faziam: comer 1 cordeiro branco com 1 ano todas as Páscoas.

    Os comentários que aqui se vêem são profundamente preocupantes, pois revelam como a sociedade está muito longe da Ciência."

    ResponderExcluir
  15. Dr Souto,
    Já cheguei à pensar em me "cadastrar" em seu blog como médico/Paleo, no entanto, te confesso que até o momento não somente te admiro como te "invejo", pois não fui muito capaz de convencer muitas pessoas para esta dieta saudável (quase nada ou muitíssimo pouco). E como tentei! E Muito! Estou há mais de 1 ANO NA TENTATIVA, mas sem sucesso! Triste e desanimado! Confesso e estou até desistindo do fato, pois parece-me que estou fazendo papel de louco/desequilibrado. Não possuo o seu dom da palavra, os seus predicados. Mas sempre indicando o seu Blog! Mesmo não tendo retorno à respeito, talvez.....Por este motivo, te admiro a cada dia mais!
    (Graças a Deus que na minha área, oftamologia, minha agenda de atendimento é sempre muito mais do que ultra repleta, se eu trabalhasse até meia noite, teria atendimento. Mas não me é possível. Ainda bem!)
    Fico no que sei fazer. E continuo te "invejando", pela sua Grande Capacidade!!!
    O Trabalho que faz, é realmente de EXTREMA GRANDEZA E GRANDIOSIDADE. PARABÉNS!!!
    Parabéns Mesmo!
    Abraço cordial,
    Bernard (MD)

    ResponderExcluir
  16. Prezado Dr. Souto e amigos paleo que o auxiliam,
    Procurei no blog pelo google mas nao encontrei.. Existe algum post onde se comenta a necessidade ou não da ingestão de minerais (quelatos) como magnésio, cálcio, etc em forma de capsulas. Além disso sabem se é vantajoso tomar o seguinte produto: Doctor's Best Real Krill Enhanced with DHA and EPA ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B003XA2IGS?cache=bd74588a0f12d2e92b5c080a98150f45&pi=SY200_QL40&qid=1402961706&sr=8-1#ref=mp_s_a_1_1 ). Obrigado

    ResponderExcluir
  17. Olá,

    magnésio pode ser ingerido na forma de óxido de mg. Este é sempre indicado, ajuda nas cãibras, no sono, ajuda no controle glicêmico, evita que o cálcio se deposite nas artérias, ajuda nas arritmias. No caso do cálcio, penso que somente se a dieta é pobre em cálcio. Se for caso de osteoprose, é muito mais importante sol e vit D. Quanto ao suplemento, parece que uma alimentação onde peixes e crustáceos, frutos do mar estão presentes resolve este caso. Se comer peixe não é o hábito, pode ser que 1 a 3g de óleo de peixe ao dia pode seja uma boa opção.

    ResponderExcluir
  18. Andrei Rocha de Almeida16 de junho de 2014 22:51

    Gostei do texto. Boa parte baseada no livro "The Big Fat Surprise" que também tem muito do "Good Calories and Bad Calories". Só não gostei da parte que se coloca polinsaturadas e monoinsaturadas como benéficas. Sabemos que as poli não são.

    ResponderExcluir
  19. Dr. Souto, hoje eu iniciei o uso de amido resistente, consumi 1 colher de sopa de polvilho doce (marca Kodilar, foi a única que encontrei e resolvi testar) dissolvido em água, logo após o consumo, tive uma sensação de mal estar, fraqueza, sonolência, desânimo, além de uma sensação ruim na barriga, embora meu intestino funcionou logo após (sem diarreia ou gazes). É normal sentir estes sintomas? Se sim, dura quanto tempo? Ou seria um sinal de que esta marca não é confiável?

    Outra dúvida, a faseolamina (farinha do feijão branco) é um tipo de amido resistente (já que tem resultados semelhantes)?

    Obrigada.

    ResponderExcluir
  20. Espere alguns dias. Se continuar assim, substitua por fécula de batata. Também pode ser interessante saber a sua glicose antes e depois.

    ResponderExcluir
  21. Use o sal rosa do Himalaia e a preocupação com suplementação mineral simplesmente desaparece. E boa parte da fome durante o dia também.

    ResponderExcluir
  22. Salvo para futura utilização. Argumentação perfeita, muito bom.

    ResponderExcluir
  23. Veja esse link: http://chriskresser.com/why-you-should-think-twice-about-vegetarian-and-vegan-diets É o texto mais completo que já li sobre o assunto!

    ResponderExcluir
  24. Jose Marcelo Vieira17 de junho de 2014 00:24

    E nós temos dentes caninos até hoje... animais vegetarianos tem caninos?

    ResponderExcluir
  25. Olá Patrícia, obrigada pelos esclarecimentos. Mas estes sintomas relatados são normais?

    ResponderExcluir
  26. Junior, obrigada pela sua resposta.

    ResponderExcluir
  27. Não me parecem normais. O que é normal são os gases, que duram em torno de 15 dias apenas. Se não está te fazendo bem, pare!

    ResponderExcluir
  28. Olá, Patrícia.


    Você sabe me dizer se aquele magnésio que é mais divulgado pela internet,
    o tal Cloreto de Magnésio P.A., promove os mesmos benefícios que o óxido de mg ? Ou há
    uma diferença grande na ação no organismo entre eles ? Muito obrigado!!

    ResponderExcluir
  29. Obrigado, mas no caso do magnésio, sendo ele quelado não seria de mais fácil absorção do que o encontrado no sal rosa?

    ResponderExcluir
  30. O quelado é melhor, mais caro e mais difícil de achar.
    Em 17/06/2014 07:57, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  31. A conclusão da meta-análise do Chowdhury diz que "não há evidências de que as mono e poliinsaturadas sejam benéficas", assim como "não há evidências de que as saturadas sejam maléficas".

    ResponderExcluir
  32. Dr. é verdade que o consumo de gordura atrapalharia na restauração do intestino danificado e que o ideal seria reduzir o consumo de gordura durante esse período de restauração?

    ResponderExcluir
  33. Obrigado Dr. Souto. Aproveito para lhe perguntar quando irás ao RJ promover a paleoideologia?!

    ResponderExcluir
  34. eu usei uma ves a fecula de batata da yoki so que eu fiquei meio tonto sei la,meio triste,ai eu tou usando a banana verde desde então so que ja fas mais de 2 meses e so vivo com gases.motivo nao sei muitos dizen que passa logo comigo não passou

    ResponderExcluir
  35. Não.
    Em 17/06/2014 16:02, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  36. Já fui! Aguardo novo convite
    Em 17/06/2014 16:43, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  37. "Dr. Dean Ornish, founder of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute, whose low-fat, almost vegan diet has been shown in one study to reverse arterial blockage"

    Um estudo apenas contra dezenas de estudos mostrando que ele está errado? E, muito provavelmente, é um estudo populacional/epidemiológico de qualidade bem duvidosa. Para acabar com o maldito do Ornish, poderiam ter salientado isso na reportagem. Um parênteses rápido explicando a diferença já seria suficiente para acabar com a graça dele.

    ResponderExcluir
  38. sim, vários têm. cavalos, por exemplo. de cabeça lembro até de umas espécies de "veados dente-de-sabre", rs, é impressionante. Hipopótamos... enfim, vários.

    "6º - O carnivorismo é natural e normal há centenas de milhões de anos e
    milhões de espécies sobreviveram graças a serem carnívoras." <- achei esse argumento incrivelmente falho. Ora, também temos milhaaares de espécies que sobreviveram e sobrevivem sendo herbívoras - na verdade são maioria, ou as teias alimentares entrariam em colapso. da mesma forma que temos mais vegetais do que herbivoros. nada a ver esse paralelo maluco.

    ResponderExcluir
  39. Esse é um bom texto sobre o assunto. Leiam: http://chriskresser.com/why-you-should-think-twice-about-vegetarian-and-vegan-diets
    Se começar uma discussão sobre isso, vou deletar tudo.
    Em 17/06/2014 21:16, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  40. Uma das melhores formas de magnésio para suplementação é o aspartato de magnésio. Esta forma de magnésio é quelada com ácido aspártico (uma aminoácido) e possui alta absorção.

    ResponderExcluir
  41. Será que com essa publicação tão renomeada, a SBC não vai mudar suas diretrizes?

    ResponderExcluir
  42. Hahaha. Conta uma de papagaio agora :-)

    Infelizmente, vão continuar ignorando por muito tempo - mas o simples fato de a reportagem existir, já é um indício de que as coisas estão mudando...

    Você não lembra como a Associação Britânica de Cardiologia reagiu, quando o estudo do Dr. Chowdhury saiu ? http://www.paleodiario.com/2014/03/porque-quase-tudo-o-que-te-ensinaram.html



    Basicamente, é: "mesmo com todas essas evidências dizendo que gordura saturada não faz mal, vamos continuar afirmando que faz" :-(

    ResponderExcluir
  43. Even experts like Harvard’s Hu, who says people shouldn’t be concerned about total fat, draw the line at fully exonerating saturated fat. “I do worry that if people get the message that saturated fat is fine, they’ll [adopt] unhealthy habits,” he says. “We should be focusing on the quality of food, of real food.”

    ResponderExcluir
  44. Muitíssimo obrigada Hilton. Posso abusar um pouquinho da sua boa vontade, rsrsrs. Dá pra você traduzir aquela receita de pão sem farinha pra gente. o "Oopsies"? Agradeço antecipadamente!!! Abraço.

    ResponderExcluir
  45. A presença de presas não define herbívoros ou carnívoros, pessoal. Os elefantes, por exemplo, usam aquelas presas enormes para se alimentar?

    ResponderExcluir
  46. Hilton, a salvação da lavoura.

    ResponderExcluir
  47. Dr.Souto, boa tarde,
    off topic, desculpe, mas não sei onde postar:
    entendi num post anterior porque minha glicemia em jejum que nunca passou de 80 agora, que estou em cetose, dá em torno de 120...
    Só que ao longo do dia, mesmo sem passar de 20 carbos e com ingesta de gorduras, tenho marcado 110, 118 - 02 horas depois da refeição, em algumas vezes..
    Percebi que isso acontece 1 ou 2 dias depois de perídos de jejum de 16, 20 horas... Há alguma relação entre o aumento de glicemia e jejum intermitente??

    ResponderExcluir
  48. Jose Marcelo Vieira18 de junho de 2014 15:51

    Eu conheço um vegano, e desde que se tornou vegano passou a tomar injeções de citoneurim 4 vezes por ano, e ele diz que sempre foi e é saudável, não é atleta ou praticante intensivo de algum esporte. As pessoas que o conhecem a mais tempo dizem que ele era mais forte mais encorpado quando era mais novo, eu já o conheci vegano. Independentemente de vegetarianismo ou não, creio que só seja necessário suplementar algo se há necessidade que a alimentação não supre, ou alguma deficiência no organismo da pessoa, resta saber os porquês dessas injeções.

    ResponderExcluir
  49. Jose Marcelo Vieira18 de junho de 2014 16:15

    Pesquisando, li que nós humanos ainda não conseguimos sintetizar todos os aminoácidos, como ocorre nos outros herbívoros. Dos 22 existentes, conseguimos sintetizar 13, os outros 9 precisam vir da alimentação. E nas proteínas AVB possui a disponibilidade dos 22 numa proporção igualitária. Nos alimentos de origem vegetal os aminoácidos existem, mas e/ou falta algum aminoácido essencial e/ou a proporção está mais diferente, e essa combinação dos AVB é importante para minimizar a perda de massa muscular, perda esta que pode trazer consequências ruins como insensibilidade a insulina e sindrome metabólica. É uma combinação de fatores em que se deve refletir. Eu gosto muito do vegetarianismo pela diversidade de vegetais e justamente por ele ser diferente do equivoco que foi a piramide alimentar na nossa alimentação, porém não arriscaria o vegetarianismo pela possibilidade de deficiência de nutrientes e suas consequências a longo prazo. Se na natureza a cadeia alimentar existe, creio que não seja anti-natural estar obtendo nutrientes de outros animais.

    ResponderExcluir
  50. Caro dr José Carlos, sou sua colega, intensivista adulto, interessada em melhorar minha qualidade de vida com atividade física regular (iniciada há mais de um ano) e dieta (há alguns meses). Buscando inspirações, acabei encontrando seu blog. Pra mim, um mundo novo se apresentando, muito interessante, diferente do que conhecia. Obrigada por dividir conosco o que vc acredita, baseado em informações consistentes. Grande abraço, com certeza serei visita freqüente em seus posts daqui pra frente.

    ResponderExcluir
  51. "true food" that's what we want

    ResponderExcluir
  52. qual seria a dose diária indicada de óxido de magnésio? obg

    ResponderExcluir
  53. Interessante sua observação, Gustavo.
    Acrescento para esclarecer aos que não conhecem as práticas alimentares cristãs, que o fato de excluírem a carne de sua dieta em determinados períodos do ano, não está associado a nenhuma razão natural, como se denotasse algum ativismo ecológico ou que carnes são ruins e fazem mal. Nada disso.
    A exclusão da carne em períodos de abstinência e jejum é justamente para denotar que o homem não vive só do alimento natural que lhe dá sustento (a carne) mas também do alimento espiritual (Deus e sua Palavra - "Nem só de pão vive o homem").
    Isso quer dizer que a teologia cristã não corrobora com nenhum movimento contra o consumo de carne.

    ResponderExcluir
  54. R. Leite, na verdade, ele quis dizer que o carnivorismo é natural para nós humanos. Nesse contexto, o argumento está correto.

    ResponderExcluir
  55. Tenho um livro aqui em casa que fala sobre todas as vitaminas, sais minerais e aminoácidos. Em cada seção, a autora vai elencando as fontes onde encontramos esses nutrientes e sempre ela começa, mais ou menos assim: encontramos esse nutriente em: carnes, vísceras, ovos, queijos e peixes, em geral... daí seguem as verduras e frutas, que vão se alternando conforme sua composição química. Ou seja, numa situação hipotética, seria mais saudável viver exclusivamente de carnes que exclusivamente de vegetais.

    ResponderExcluir
  56. Jose Marcelo Vieira19 de junho de 2014 12:40

    Fernanda eu também sinto um pouco dessa fraqueza que você relata com a fécula (yoki) porem percebo que minha urina fica com um cheiro diferente coincidentemente. O cheiro é igual a quando eu comecei lowcarb e era obeso. No meu caso não incomoda, mas eu sinto como se precisasse comer um doce ou um pão.

    ResponderExcluir
  57. Jose Marcelo Vieira19 de junho de 2014 13:06

    Retificando de 27 a 31. Do ponto de vista bíblico não há impedimento a alimentar-se de animais. E o jejum praticado pelos cristãos não significa que seja contrário a ingesta de carne. Comer peixe também não. Até mesmo porque comer carne ou não é livre arbítrio de cada um, não é um posicionamento cristão já que a bíblia não condena.

    ResponderExcluir
  58. Verdade é q essa dieta não funciona para todos. Dizer q TODOS emagrecem evitando os carbos e consumindo muita gordura é BALELA!!! Eu sou prova disso. Fiz durante 4 meses e só perdi 4 quilos, eliminados durante as 2 primeiras semanas (obviamente, boa parte de líquidos). Já fiz jejum intermitente de 24 horas e, com frequência de 5x por semana, jejum de 20 horas (só tomava café da manhã e almoçava. A próxima refeição era o café do dia seguinte). Minha ingestão diária de carboidratos líquidos não passava de 15 gramas. No meu caso, a dieta hipocalórica se mostrou muito mais eficaz, (com pão e tudo!)

    ResponderExcluir
  59. Claro que não.


    2014-06-18 5:46 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  60. É, não há quantidade de evidências que mude uma crença...


    2014-06-18 8:22 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  61. Resistência à insulina fisiológica


    Em 18 de junho de 2014 14:38, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  62. Vitamina B12


    Em 18 de junho de 2014 15:58, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  63. Obrigado, Iara!!

    Por favor, não deixe de comprar o livro Big Fat Surprise: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2014/06/o-livro-mais-importante-da-decada.html

    Em 18 de junho de 2014 18:45, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  64. Só vai piorar se vc não consumir gordura


    Em 19 de junho de 2014 09:48, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  65. E quem disse que funciona para todo mundo?? Eu não disse!

    Re-leia essa postagem: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2012/11/expectativas-versus-realidade.html
    Eis alguns trechos:

    "3) *Nem todos engordam pelos mesmos motivos*. *Não resta dúvida que o consumo excessivo de carboidratos refinados é a grande causa da epidemia de obesidade de nossos dias. Isto não significa que VOCÊ engordou por causa disso.* Há pessoas que engordaram pelo uso de medicamentos, como antidepressivos ou medicações para transtorno de humor bipolar, anti-convulsivantes, corticoides. Há pessoas que engordam devido à predisposição genética; e *há pessoas que engordam simplesmente por que comem demais."*

    *"*4) *Há pessoas que, devido ao grande excesso de peso que acumularam, ou devido a múltiplas dietas de restrição calórica prévias, apresentam o que alguns autores consideram um "desarranjo metabólico"*; isso inclui um grau de resistência à insulina e à leptina que torna o emagrecimento muito difícil. É como se o organismo se "agarrasse" ao tecido adiposo, ativamente tentando se proteger de uma escassez futura, preservando a todo o custo as reservas que possui."

    "No entanto, conheço pessoas que perderam 2 ou 3 Kg e estacionaram. Claramente há algo muito diferente, do ponto de vista metabólico, entre estes dois extremos. Em seu agora já clássico estudo, o Dr. Gardner da UCLA indica
    que *aqueles pacientes cujo excesso de peso foi causado pela resistência à insulina são os que melhor respondem à restrição de carboidratos.* Neste estudo, foram comparadas 4 dietas completamente diferentes. Embora a dieta low carb, como sempre, tenha se saído melhor que as demais NA MÉDIA, houve pacientes individuais que perderam grande quantidade de peso com TODAS as 4 dietas, e *houve pacientes que não perderam peso* em TODAS as dietas. "

    Em 19 de junho de 2014 13:59, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  66. Luiz de Gonzaga Monteiro19 de junho de 2014 15:27

    Valeu Dr, então é bola pra frente.

    ResponderExcluir
  67. E onde eu disse q vc disse q funciona pra todo mundo? Sua conclusão está muito elástica. Já li muitos apregoando essa dieta como uma alternativa viável e efetiva a TODOS sim, o q absolutamente é MENTIRA!!! Acho interessante abrir um espaço para os q tentaram a dieta e ela simplesmente não funcionou, coletar esses relatos e buscar alternativas. Deletar depoimentos negativos (e devem haver muitos!) é um grande desserviço. Eu achei muito válido saber q em algumas pessoas o índice glicêmico aumenta cerca de50% após iniciar o LCHF. Experiências negativas tbm fazem parte da vida e podem ser tão úteis qto as positivas. Mostrar só um lado da moeda é fazer propaganda é desonestidade intelectual; e quando utilizado para fazer dinheiro é charlatanismo.

    ResponderExcluir
  68. Desculpe, postei no local errado.

    ResponderExcluir
  69. Mais uma pergunta, há algum post aqui no site sobre musculação, hipertrofia, ganho de massa muscular, aliados ao LCHF?

    ResponderExcluir
  70. Em Portugal publicam-se artigos como este: http://observador.pt/vaidades/cafe-com-manteiga-esta-conquistar-os-estados-unidos-mas-sera-mesmo-saudavel/

    ResponderExcluir
  71. Varia Liste. Não encontro menos de 250mg. Veja bem, eu tinha cãibras e comecei com 250mg, não resolveu. Tive que aumentar para 400mg. Mantive assim por um bom tempo. Reduzi faz alguns meses pra 250mg novamente e não voltaram. É fácil perceber se vc excede o mg pq ele tem um leve efeito laxativo. Tome uma hora antes de dormir, pois ajuda no sono!

    ResponderExcluir
  72. http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com/2013/06/prezado-dr-souto-exercicio-sem.html

    http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2013/07/exercicio-e-emagrecimento.html

    ResponderExcluir
  73. Comecei a ler ontem mesmo! :-)

    ResponderExcluir
  74. Obrigado pela rápida resposta Dr. Um bom resto de semana para ti

    ResponderExcluir
  75. mas doutor solto no site de marksdaily e PHD,e entre outros,eles recomendão ate 150 gramas de carbo por dia.abaixo de 150 gramas e so pra quen quer perder peso muito rapido ou então pra quen nao e tão ativo

    ResponderExcluir
  76. Ok, cada um escolhe o nível de carbo que funciona para si. Minha abordagem é um pouco mais low carb.

    Como a maioria das pessoas precisam perder peso, recomendo menos de 150. Em 19/06/2014 20:10, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  77. e sobre a gordura satura doutor aqui en casa o povo ta usando manteiga a torto e a direito pricipalmente eu,o senhor disse que o pricipal e a mono agora fiquei preocupado?

    ResponderExcluir
  78. Ovo é predominantemente insaturado. Bacon idem. Porco idem. Abacate idem. Não comendo manteiga pura o tempo todo, está bem.
    Em 19/06/2014 20:21, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  79. eu sei eu tou falando assin manteiga na salada,ou no cafe,ou nunha vitamina com ovo e abacate.entedeu aqui ta se usando a manteiga com quase tudu, o povo ta tudu viciado aqui kkkk

    ResponderExcluir
  80. Bem, o certo é não fugir da gordura natural dos alimentos. Daí a acrescentar um monte de manteiga em todos os alimentos... depende do metabolismo de cada um. Tem gente que fica muito bem, e uns 20% das pessoas tem elevação forte do colesterol. Se você estiver nos 80%, pode continuar fazendo isso.


    2014-06-19 20:26 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  81. ainda mais eu que tou fazendo a dieta para hipertrofia tou ingerido bastante gordura,os carbo deixo en 150,

    ResponderExcluir
  82. acabei de ler essa noticia e gostaria de saber opinião do senhor:


    http://www.usp.br/agen/?p=179209

    ResponderExcluir
  83. Leia o que os estudos em humanos mostram: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.in/2013/02/jejum-intermitente.html
    Em 19/06/2014 21:17, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  84. Como vejo, o período pré-histórico do Paleolítico, seria o período em que o homem não precisava cultivar a terra, todo alimento estaria à disposição (esse seria o estilo paleo original)... com a "queda" e a condenação de viver "do suor do próprio rosto", o homem passou a ter que cultivar a terra, daí viria o período neolítico, a engenharia genética, a monsanto e tutti quanti...

    ResponderExcluir
  85. Coigo aconteceu a mesma coisa. Batalhei muito nesta dieta, fiz tudo à risca, mas não deu resultado. Gostaria bastante de ter experimentado a perda que as pessoas relatam aqui, mas nada ... Após quase 5 meses de dificuldades desisti. Hoje venho controlando o peso comendo de tudo, pão, etc, apenas reduzindo as calorias. O bom e velho método calorias gastas - calorias consumidas. Por sinal é bem mais agradável, fácil e barato.

    ResponderExcluir
  86. Que bom que você encontrou uma alternativa que funciona pra você.
    Em 20/06/2014 07:15, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  87. Pois é colega, mas como sabemos na internet há de sobejo relatos exitosos; os fracassos não são partilhados (uma pena! Aprende-se tanto ou até mais com eles.) e por isso nós nunca vamos saber qual a real eficácia em porcentagem dessa dieta. Já li absurdos (não aqui) que incentivam a pessoa a comer APENAS 1000 cal/dia (90% gordura e 10% proteína) para sair do platô. Pouco se sabe dos efeitos dessa dieta a longo prazo; não há grupos que foram acompanhados por 1 ano ou mais nessa dieta (q eu saiba). Já li coisas ótimas e tbm já li coisas preocupantes como falência renal, resistência a insulina, aumento do ácido úrico, aumento alarmante da glicemia e até complicações vasculares como aterosclerose (http://www.pnas.org/content/106/36/15418.full). Boa sorte e força nessa batalha.

    ResponderExcluir
  88. Há estudo de 2 anos: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Mar;68(3):350-7. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2013.290. Epub 2014 Jan 29. Long-term effects of a Palaeolithic-type diet in obese postmenopausal women: a 2-year randomized trial.

    Sugiro as leitura desta postagem: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2013/09/o-mais-alto-nivel-de-evidencia.html
    "Eu espero que não tenha escapado ao leitor o fato de que isto é uma *revisão sistemática de ensaios clínicos randomizados.* Este é, na medicina, o maior nível de evidência possível, o nível*1A.*

    Ou seja, não estamos mais, em 2013, em época de discutir se "low carb vai entupir suas artérias" ou outros comentários igualmente primitivos. No século 21, a discussão é travada baseada em evidências, cuja hierarquia é bem definida.

    E quanto ao benefício ao *longo prazo?* Ninguém sabe. Por que ninguém sabe? Porque, em virtude da desinformação e do preconceito, as entidades patrocinadoras deste tipo de estudo nunca incluíram um braço low carb nos seus grandes estudos prospectivos e randomizados de longa duração (como oWHI ou o MRFIT ).

    Assim, temos a seguinte situação:

    Sabemos COM CERTEZA que low fat não é bom no longo prazo (esta já foi testada em estudos prospectivos e randomizados e fracassou SEMPRE ).

    No contexto evolutivo, uma faz sentido e a outra não . Nos estudos de até 3 anos de duração, low carb é SEMPRE melhor no que diz respeito aos fatores de risco cardiovasculares, perda de peso, etc, em mais de 18 estudos prospectivos randomizados (veja aqui , e aqui ).

    Com base nisso, temos duas opções:

    *Opção A (baixa gordura, alto carboidrato)* - é uma *novidade* introduzida em 1977, acreditava-se que era bom, foi testada no longo prazo e não mostrou benefício, e sua introdução coincidiu com uma epidemia de obesidade e diabetes sem precedente , e há mecanismos fisiopatológicos que poderiam explicar este efeito. Além disso, estudo prospectivo e randomizado recente mostrou que mata 30% mais do que uma dieta com mais gordura .

    *Opção B (baixo carboidrato, alta gordura)* - é a forma com a qual a humanidade sempre se alimentou durante a evolução da espécie (cerca de 2.500.000 anos), mas a partir de 1977 passou a ser condenada *sem que houvesse estudos* nesse sentido. Os estudos *foram* conduzidos e *não*confirmaram
    as suspeitas de que fosse ruim . Em todos os estudos comparativos com a opção A , há melhora em relação a perda de peso e fatores de risco cardiovascular. Nunca foi formalmente testada no longo prazo (exceto, talvez, por 2,5 milhões de anos).

    A - sabe-se que *não ajuda*, e *há evidências de que prejudique*;
    B - *sabe-se que é benéfica* *no curto prazo*, apenas não foi testada no longo prazo, mas vem sendo praticada há 2,5 milhões de anos.


    Eu opto por B (low carb, paleo). *E você?"*


    Em 20 de junho de 2014 09:07, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  89. Conclusions:
    A PD has greater
    beneficial effects vs an NNR diet regarding fat mass, abdominal obesity
    and triglyceride levels in obese postmenopausal women; effects not
    sustained for anthropometric measurements at 24 months. Adherence to
    protein intake was poor in the PD group. The long-term consequences of
    these changes remain to be studied.


    Uma ilação deverás inconclusiva, na minha opinião. Aliás, nenhum dos benefícios citados (perda de peso moderada, perda de gordura abdominal, queda no triglicerídeos) são novidade. O grupo específico (mulheres obesas na faixa dos 60 anos) é uma minoria e não se sabe se os efeitos seriam os mesmo em um grupo heterogêneo. São as consequências que me preocupam. Por que os efeitos não foram sustentados por medidas antropométricas? Por que a adesão de proteínas foi ruim no grupo low fat? Consequências a serem estudas.
    Grato pela atenção e muito sucesso.

    ResponderExcluir
  90. Porque o grande problema com qualquer plano de dieta no longo prazo é a adesão. As pessoas vão largando, e os problemas retornando. Mas veja, porque você se preocuparia com segurança no longo prazo quando os estudos mostram MAIS benefício desta abordagem do que das demais, e sabendo-se que é aquela mais próxima da qual evoluímos? Uma coisa é a pessoa não gostar da dieta. Ou não ter bons resultados. Mas não consigo aceitar que se diga que faz mal, quando a totalidade das evidências mostra o oposto:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1270002/

    O problema é o tipo de análise, chamada intent to treat. Ele compara os grupos, incluindo que está fazendo e quem largou. Se comparasse que SEGUE fazendo, seria bem diferente.

    Leia: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/bogus-studies/the-fraud-of-intention-to-treat-analysis/

    Em 20 de junho de 2014 10:19, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  91. Obrigado Dr. E eu não postei meu insucesso porque fiquei chateado, nem para criticar o blog nem nada. Apenas fiquei frustrado porque esperei demais. Um amigo meu perdeu 12 Kg seguindo paleo e mesmo comendo frutas. Mas eu sei que as pessoas são diferentes, e para a maioria das pessoas eu sei que a dieta paleo é eficaz, e por isso continuo incentivando as pessoas que queiram segui-la a fazer sua própria experiência, assim como continuo acreditando no grande serviço prestado pelo blog, tanto que continuo a segui-lo.
    ; )

    ResponderExcluir
  92. :-)
    http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2012/11/expectativas-versus-realidade.html
    Já vi pessoas começarem a perder peso após 45 dias de dieta (sem perder nada antes)


    Em 20 de junho de 2014 11:08, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  93. Marcela B. Azevedo Constâncio20 de junho de 2014 11:48

    A também a própria vida do Dr. Atkins, que viveu bem e veio a falecer com mais de 70 anos e mesmo assim por acidente, nada relacionado com a dieta de pouco carbo e muita gordura.

    ResponderExcluir
  94. Prezado Dr.,

    Particularmente eu gosto muito da dieta LCHF. Prefiro mil vezes um bife ensanguentado frito na banha de porco do que torradinha com geléia light e chá de camomila. Detesto sentir fome e só como o que eu gosto (pena não existir cerveja low carb! Nem tudo é perfeito). Nunca me adaptei por muito tempo às dietas "passa fome". Se for para sentir fome e ficar de mau humor o dia todo nem tento. (Que raios de dieta que te deixa irascível pode fazer bem?). Praticamente não tive efeitos colaterais com a LCHF, exceto um calafrio nas mãos e pés (somente no primeiro dia) e mau hálito que passou em 3 semanas. Infelizmente, não perdi o peso que esperava (e precisava... ou melhor, preciso.), apesar da EXCELENTE adaptação fisiológica e psicológica.

    O que eu entendi desse estudo apontado pelo sr. foi a baixa adesão de proteína no grupo que faz low carb e não na adesão da dieta.


    Tenho receio maior quanto os POSSÍVEIS malefícios que um excesso de proteína (20 a 30% do total calórico diário) pode causar a longo prazo, e não de gordura, como o identificado nesse estudo feito com 6 mil pacientes acompanhados por DEZOITO ANOS, onde uma faixa etária específica de idosos mostrou-se mais propensa ao câncer, diabetes mellitus e uma taxa de mortalidade 75% maior (http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/pdf/S1550-4131%2814%2900062-X.pdf).


    Não aceito, devido a nulidade de evidências científicas e lógica metafísica, a idéia de evolução (concordo plenamente que a maioria dos Homo sapiens do alto paleolítico não enchiam a barriga de trigo e similares. No baixo paleolítico é outra história apesar, é claro, do consumo de produtos de alto ig ser muito menor em qualquer época da História do que temos hoje). Contudo, mesmo se esta teoria estiver correta, temos que considerar que a expectativa de vida do indivíduo paleolítico não era superior a 30 anos. Logo, quais são as consequências dessa dieta numa população que atualmente atinge vive além dos 75 anos?


    Desculpe se estou sendo aborrecedor ou inconveniente. Grato pela atenção.

    ResponderExcluir
  95. Marcela, meu avô morreu com mais de 80 fumando feito uma chaminé desde os 7 anos. O velho nunca fez low carb, apesar de ser chegado numa gordura suína e ser magro feito uma vareta. Acredito que longevidade é, antes de tudo, uma condição genética. E minha maior preocupação é quanto a alta ingestão de proteínas, não de gordura animal. Abraços.

    ResponderExcluir
  96. As mulheres do estudo em questão comeram proteína de menos, não demais. Low carb não é de alta proteína.
    Em 20/06/2014 12:11, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  97. Quanto ao estudo que vc referiu, é epidemiológico: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com/2012/07/dieta-atkins-aumenta-o-risco.html Em 20/06/2014 12:29, "Jose Carlos Souto" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  98. Faço duas considerações antes de cessar definitivamente minhas postagens nesse blog:


    1. A premissa que LCHF não é de alta proteína não resiste a menor análise e uma grande bobagem. Basta não ser um completo analfabeto em matemática para constatar o óbvio: LCHF é uma dieta onde 25% das calorias são proteínas. E daí, as dietas convencionais também não são? Claro q a porcentagem está próxima, mas dietas em geral tem calorias limitadas o q não ocorre na LCHF. Logo,uma pessoa (com baixa atividade física) em cetose pode facilmente ingerir cerca de 3000 mil cal/dia, ou próximo a 190 gramas de proteína; na média, mais de 2 gramas de proteína por quilo de massa magra, o que é um índice de fisiculturista.


    2. Parabéns doutor. O sr. refutou um estudo que levou 18 anos para ser concluído em apenas uma linha. O sr. é um colosso.

    ResponderExcluir
  99. 1) 2 gramas não está associado a nenhum risco;
    2) As dietas low carb não têm 3000 calorias, caso contrário a pessoa não perderia peso. Leia aqui para aprender que não se trata de dieta hipercalórica nem hiperproteica: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com.br/2012/05/dieta-e-perigosa-para-os-rins.html
    3) Eu não refutei em uma linha, eu dei um link para uma postagem INTEIRA onde eu analiso o referido estudo;
    4) O estudo não é um estudo de 18 anos. Um questionário foi aplicado UMA VEZ, 18 anos atrás, e ninguém mais viu o que as pessoas comiam a partir de então. E, 18 anos depois, se comparou o que houve. Mas, se você tivesse lido o linkl, saberia disso.
    5) Estou sendo obrigado a bloqueá-lo por terceira reincidência em falta de educação, não posso ficar o dia inteiro editando seus comentários grosseiros.

    ResponderExcluir
  100. doutor solto estou olhando essas conversas desse cara ai,e impressão minha ou ele ta tirando onda com a cara do senhor?

    ResponderExcluir
  101. Sim, e minha extrema paciência chegou no limite, e já bloqueei. Nunca bloqueio ninguém por descordar de mim, mas com respeito.


    Em 20 de junho de 2014 14:56, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  102. Dr. Souto, com relação ao ovo, andei fazendo umas pesquisas e gostaria de saber a sua opinião sobre o que encontrei:


    1. Ovo cru pode transmitir salmonela e se for lavado poderia se eliminar uma película protetora que impediria a passagem de bactérias para o interior do ovo;


    2. A avidina presente na clara bloquearia a absorção da vitamina B6 e da biotina presente na gema;


    3. O cozimento ou fritura dos ovos degradariam as proteínas presentes na clara e na gema, tornando-as menos biodisponíveis;


    4. Para contornar esses problemas recomendar-se-ia apenas o aquecimento dos ovos por alguns poucos minutos a uma temperatura menor que 70 graus, tanto para eliminar qualquer contaminação por salmonela, como para não prejudicar as proteínas existentes na gema e na clara, como também para neutralizar a ação da avidina, preservando tanto a biodisponibilidade das proteinas como da vitamina B 6, como da biotina.


    Essas afirmações procedem? obg.

    ResponderExcluir
  103. você é muito paciente

    ResponderExcluir
  104. Parece uma boa ideia. Mas, quando eu lavo, lavo logo antes de usar.
    Em 21/06/2014 07:15, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  105. E as represálias já se iniciaram: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2014/05/15/saturated-or-not-does-type-of-fat-matter

    ResponderExcluir
  106. Dr Souto, tenho mais algumas dúvidas, primariamente em relação ao site bulletproof exec.

    1. Ele recomenda comer cortes gordos de gado alimentado a pasto, e se o boi for alimentado com ração para comer partes mais magras. Moro no RJ, e mesmo aqui acho muito dificil achar carnes orgânicas, a maioria dos mercados recebem carnes de diversos fornecedores, e a maioria é Friboi, pelo que vi no site deles o gado é criado em confinamento. Sempre tenho comido acém ou fraldinha por ser mais gorda e barata. Como proceder?

    2. Ele tem um infografico com o que comer, e vai do tóxico ao "bulletproof". Não uso mais adoçante, mas minha namorada sempre usa acessulfame, e ele coloca no fim da lista como pior que açúcar, e coloca o xilitol no topo junto com stevia, porém nao consumo poliois devido ao seu post sobre adoçantes, realmente a toxicidade eh essa?

    3. Consumo quase diariamente queijos, embora hoje em dia já em menor quantidade que no início, ele coloca como tóxico qualquer queijo, por ter caseína, este tipo de problema com queijo é realmente universal ou só pra quem é alérgico?

    Obrigado Dr!

    ResponderExcluir
  107. Ele é exagerado. Quanto ao gado, pode até fazer sentido tirar a capa de gordura. O xilitol é uma boa alternativa, bem melhor que o Maltitol (olha a tabela daquela postagem).
    Em 21/06/2014 12:07, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  108. O Sr. recomenda evitar cortes como acem, fraldinha, picanha em caso de não haver carnes orgânicas a disposição? O acém é mais complicado pelo fato de ser moída. Temo não encontrar com facilidade ou a preços mais acessíveis carne criada a pasto por aqui e ter que reduzir a ingestão de carne vermelha.

    ResponderExcluir
  109. O ótimo não pode ser o inimigo do bom.
    Em 21/06/2014 12:18, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  110. Outras perguntas Dr. Souto

    O Dr Mercola, nesse e outros posts, http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/09/02/why-does-this-commonly-vilified-food-actually-prevent-heart-disease-and-cancer.aspx fala sobre os problemas de comer ovos mexidos, ou com gema já dura, e recomenda primariamente comer ovos crus, e também alerta que ovos enriquecidos com omega 3 são os piores possíveis, fico então na dúvida. Tenho feito agora ovos fritos no óleo de coco e sempre tento virar os ovos para fritar o restante da clara e tentar comer o ovo com a gema mole, porém ainda estou aprendendo a fazê-los já que costumo virar e a gema estourar na hora. É realmente significante o risco maior de se comer ovos com colesterol oxidado de gema dura? Como sempre os ovos com omega 3 por serem mais baratos que os realmente orgânicos, o perigo é real e deveria usar somente orgânicos ou é um exagero?

    ResponderExcluir
  111. Exagero. Perigoso é pão francês.
    Em 21/06/2014 21:03, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  112. Entendi, ótimo.


    Quanto aos ovos de codorna, tenho achado com muito mais facilidades orgânicos, e olhando cuidadosamente vejo que possui ligeiramente mais nutrição e um pouco menos de omega-6, pode ser uma outra boa fonte de alimento também né?


    Obrigado!

    ResponderExcluir
  113. Este rapaz está só querendo axincalhar o blogg. Não tem argumentos. E o senhor ainda tem a paciência de responder. Tenho visto tantos comentários absurdos em outros sites, que já não me assusto com nada. Vida que segue doutor

    ResponderExcluir
  114. Este cara não sossega. Chega.

    ResponderExcluir
  115. Já o bani.

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 21/06/2014 21:51, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  116. Parabéns! Esse texto merece ser um depoimento publicado! Com certeza servirá de inspiração para aqueles que sofrem dos mesmos problemas que você enfrentou ;).

    ResponderExcluir
  117. Então, esse história da película é verdadeira. O problema seria lavar e armazenar. Entendi. obg

    ResponderExcluir
  118. Compre carne no mercado, não de monopólios.

    ResponderExcluir
  119. Suspeito que esse negócio de não cozinhar e não fritar seja uma teoria para favorecer a propaganda do ovo industrializado-higienizado-enriquecido-pasteurizado.

    ResponderExcluir
  120. Leticia, obrigada por compartilhar esse depoimento maravilhoso!

    ResponderExcluir
  121. ;) Obrigada. Achei que seria legal compartilhar com o pessoal, afinal tem muita gente no mesmo barco. Abraços, Patrícia.

    ResponderExcluir
  122. Foi minha intenção Pri. Acredito que existam vários caminhos para um emgrecimento saudável, depende de vários fatores. Esse foi e está sendo o meu. Além do mais, quando estamos felizes com algo geralmente dá vontade de falar pra todo mundo hehe. :) Bom dia pra vc.

    ResponderExcluir
  123. Olá Vinícius,


    pelo contrário, os relatos que vejo são sempre de melhora da pele,cabelos, unhas. Enfim, nem tudo está relacionado com a dieta. Pode ser alguma reação alérgica não alimentar. Vale observar se comeu algo diferente, algum tempero, glúten, etc

    ResponderExcluir
  124. Vinícius Petrolli22 de junho de 2014 19:46

    Oi Patrícia. Obrigado pela resposta. Existe possibilidade de ser algo não relacionado a alimentação. Estou verificando as possibilidades por exclusão. Abraços

    ResponderExcluir
  125. e por risso que ten gente que quando vai comer o ovo cru ai se separa a clara da gema,come a gema com o que quiser e clara come com outras coisas

    ResponderExcluir
  126. Há duas hipóteses para esse problema; primeiro: se você está emagrecendo, então está queimando gordura. As gorduras são depósitos de toxinas no seu organismo. Essas toxinas, agora livres das células de gordura, ficam transitando pelo seu organismo até serem eliminadas pela excreção ou definitivamente metabolizadas (o jejum intermitente ajuda nessa questão). Então, por causa das toxinas, surgem dores de cabeça, dores nas juntas, vermelhidão e urticária.
    Outra hipótese, que acho menos provável, diz respeito à utilização de determinado tipo de adoçante. Há relatos de uso excessivo de sucralose e urticária, vermelhidão e coceira.
    Seja como for, se for o mesmo que aconteceu comigo, com o tempo passa.

    ResponderExcluir
  127. Bom dia Dr. Souto!! Agradeço a resposta!! Esperava que fosse isso... duvida: devo refazer meus exames no final do mes. Se levar números como esses para minha médica certamente ela vai querer medicar como pre diabetes. Como devo proceder para evitar isso??
    em tempo: nem vou elogiar o blog e seu trabalho...seria chover no molhado!! Mas tenho que registrar que adoro o seu bom humor!! Lógico que os posts são altamente relevantes e estou lendo todos. Mas o hit são as suas respostas nos comments!! Impagáveis!!

    ResponderExcluir
  128. Vinícius Petrolli23 de junho de 2014 10:56

    Oi. Obrigado pela resposta. Eu estava usando este sabão quando começaram os sintomas, mas ja usei outras vezes e nunca tive problemas.

    ResponderExcluir
  129. Vinícius Petrolli23 de junho de 2014 11:00

    Eu estou fazendo a dieta faz mais de 4 meses e só agora os sintomas começaram. Perdi 6 quilos no inicio e depois estabilizei. Há algumas semanas comecei a utilizar mais adoçante pra fazer o bolinho que o Dr. Souto recomendou para lanche, mas não é a base de sucralose. Abraços

    ResponderExcluir
  130. Eu sou alergica/intolerante a uma extensa lista de produtos e os sintomas melhoraram muito com a exclusão do gluten e açucares da alimentação. Cerca de 30 dias depois de iniciar a dieta (cetogenica) voltei a ter pruridos, ulceraçoes, inchaço...sintomas que só desapareceram com a exclusão da sucralose. Testei algumas vezes depois e os sintomas reaparecem principalmente com o uso do Linea pó... Estou testando agora Stevia 100% (no máximo 10 gotas/dia) sem reações por enquanto...

    ResponderExcluir
  131. Sucralose é um problema para alguns.

    ResponderExcluir
  132. pode ser intoxicação, reação alérgica... é bom ver um médico.

    ResponderExcluir
  133. Obrigado :-)

    Coma batatas, tapioca, etc (bastante) por 3 noites, e repita os exames. Vai dar normal.


    Em 23 de junho de 2014 10:51, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  134. olha ai galera como fazer manteiga de qualidade http://www.positron.org/food/butter/ so traduzir pelo google

    ResponderExcluir
  135. Olá, Dr Souto
    Estou começando a me informar sobre essa dieta há poucas semanas, e o que mais me chamou a atenção foi os relatos de melhoras nas doenças crônicas, como a rinite, que sofro desde pequena. Sou magra, pratico musculação 4x a 5x por semana por que adoro e meus treinos são sempre focados em crescimento muscular, força e hipertrofia. Sempre tive muita dificuldade em ganhar peso, mesmo comendo carboidratos a vontade, mas aos poucos fui tentando melhorar as fontes desses carboidratos, pois sempre tive em mente que seria possivel ganhar alguns quilinhos de massa muscular SEM acumular mais gordurihas localizadas, que sempre tive também.
    Gostaria de saber se isso é possível com a dieta paleo (??) Acredito que "engordar" de forma saudavel seja possivel, também.

    ResponderExcluir
  136. sim e assin que tou fazendo uma dieta hipercalorica com gorduras boas, e no maximo 150 gramas de carbo ao dia,proteina 2 gramas por quilo,e o restante de gorduras e olha vou dizar eu tou ficando forte,sei la eu sinto meus musculos mais cheios mais fortes o povo da academia ja mi olha diferente,kkkkkkk,exemplo de gorduras boas-gemas de ovos -abacates-azeite-manteiga ghee-en vez de peito de frango compre coxa com sobrecoxa-e ate mais barato-nessas 150 gramas de carbos coma bastante vegetais verdes faça vitaminas com eles seu corpo precisa de vitaminas e minerais,espinafre- rucula -acelga-agrião-brocolis e couve-salsa tamben.tome omega 3 com açafrão para evitar qualquer tipo de inflamação que vc tenha,existe varias dicas se eu for falar aqui passarei o dia falando,kkkkkkkk

    ResponderExcluir
  137. Olá Inayá

    pra quem não precisa emagrecer, frutas e raízes são liberados. Quando corte glúten, açúcar e leite minha sinusite desapareceu. Leia: http://lowcarb-paleo.blogspot.com/2013/06/prezado-dr-souto-exercicio-sem.html

    ResponderExcluir
  138. Olá, José Felipe. Estou pensando em elaborar um cardápio para hipertrofia baseado em paleo. Quantas calorias vc tá ingerindo? o que acha deste cardápio? http://www.treinomestre.com.br/hugh-jackman-treino-e-dieta-para-o-filme-wolverine-imortal/

    ResponderExcluir
  139. minhas calorias geralmente ta dando mais de 3000 mil calorias,esse cardapiio dele ai nao ten nada de paleo,ten aveia e ate centeio,e sen falar que o cardapio dele e pra quen ta fazendo cutting ten muita pouca gordura e hipocalorica e mais pra perda de peso,

    ResponderExcluir
  140. E você tomava bastante água? E quanto aos exercícios? Qual era sua ingestão de proteína?

    ResponderExcluir
  141. Roger, o blogspot.com é gratuito e livre. Crie seu blog e coloque nele todos os seus insucessos e escreva desse jeito esquisito, com metade da frase em minúsculo e a outra parte em MAIÚSCULO. Boa sorte e um lindo abraço.

    ResponderExcluir
  142. Ok. Mas qual a sua opinião em substituir esses carboidratos e, ficar com um cardápio na casa das 4000 calorias, já que o "cardápio" dá umas 6000 calorias!?

    ResponderExcluir
  143. e realmente quen ta en fase de cutting ten que fazer low carb,mas ten pessoas que tolerão mais carbo do que outras.da uma lida aqui http://www.marksdailyapple.com/gain-weight-build-muscle/#axzz34whHBiyU

    ResponderExcluir
  144. Gosto dessa frase...

    ResponderExcluir
  145. Marcela B. Azevedo Constâncio24 de junho de 2014 14:56

    Roger, mas esta forma de se alimentar não "prega" alta proteína, ao contrário, Dr. Solto fala sempre que deve ficar entre 1,5 a 2 gr de proteína por Kg de peso (acho que é essa a proporção), mas seja qual for, foi a mesma que médicos por ai a fora falaram. Até porque se voce quiser ficar em cetose, a alta proteína pode ser prejudicial, foi o que entendi lendo sobre o assunto. Mas em fim, tbm não perdi muito peso, já medidas e percentual de gordura foi bastante.

    ResponderExcluir
  146. é maravilhosa!

    ResponderExcluir
  147. Meus cabelos praticamente não caem mais. Minhas unhas não são mais quebradiças, estão quase iguais as do Wolverine (rs) e as medidas, claro, diminuíram. O humor excelente, com raríssimas exceções. Na primeira semana se foi 1,6kg (estou há cerca de 1 mês). E depois que criei coragem pra retomar a musculação, que já praticava antes, descobri uma FORÇA DESCOMUNAL em mim. Resultado: aumentei 600g. O saldo negativo da perda é de 1kg. Meu corpo tem pedido aumento das cargas e, claro, pedi um treino CURTO E INTENSO. É comum alguém perder tão pouco e já estagnar?! Ou será porque a musculação tá pesada e estou adquirindo músculos. O que fazer? Mudo alguma coisa?! Obs.: minha base de medição são as roupas e uma avaliação física que o personal fez há 2 meses, antes de começar low-carb. Serve tbm. Que mais?! Paciência? Jejum? Ou deixo tudo como está?!

    ResponderExcluir
  148. Estou com algumas dúvidas e tenho alguns relatos a fazer. Primeiro a parte boa: meus cabelos praticamente não caem mais. Minhas unhas não são mais quebradiças, estão quase iguais as do Wolverine (rs) e as medidas, claro, diminuíram. O humor excelente, com raríssimas exceções. Minha vesícula parou de doer completamente. Minha dúvida vem a seguir. Na primeira semana se foi 1,6kg (estou há cerca de 1 mês no total). Retomei a musculação e fui pegando mais pesado, de acordo com o que o corpo pedia. Treino intenso e curta duração. Descobri uma FORÇA DESCOMUNAL que não sabia que existia em mim. Resultado: aumentei 600g. O saldo negativo da perda é de 1kg. É comum alguém perder tão pouco e já estagnar?! Ou será porque a musculação tá pesada e estou adquirindo músculos em maior proporção do que perco peso gordo? O que fazer? Ou não fazer?!(rs) Paciência? Mudanças? Sinto que este ainda não é o ponto final da perda de peso, há muito excesso ainda que eu sei que carrego comigo. Mudo alguma coisa?! Obs.: minha base de medição são as roupas e uma avaliação física que o personal fez há 2 meses, antes de começar low-carb. Serve tbm. Que mais?! Paciência? Jejum? Ou deixo tudo como está e aguardo?! Alimentação: cortei praticamente todos os carbos; como muito de vez em quando raízes, mas em pouquíssima quantidade; aumentei o consumo de azeite de oliva, verduras, baicon, manteiga (bendito café..hummm..), gorduras dos animais eu traço de verdade, não cortei os queijos, mas não consumo mais que 03 fatias por dia.

    ResponderExcluir
  149. Massa magra pesa, viu?


    Em 24 de junho de 2014 23:09, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  150. com certeza e massa magra nen se preocupe,se vc ja cortou os carbos,gordura e que não e,e com o passar dos tempos seu corpo vai se acostumando a queimar mais e mais gordura,vai virar uma fornalha de queimar gordura,nen se preocupe,eu mesmo quando tou fazendo exercicio eu sinto meu corpo esquentar de um jeito parece que vai pegar fogo,kkkkkk e olha que nen cortei tanto os carbos,eu deixei en 150g,e se tumar termogenico menino sai de baixo,queima legal,kkkk ten ves que termino o exercicio o corpo pegando fogo e a roupa ensopada

    ResponderExcluir
  151. Ah! Desconfiei, mas sabe como é mulher... quer ver o ponteiro descer. Mas vou ter paciência que as coisas devem se ajeitar depois de uns 6 meses ou 1 ano. Sem pressa! :D

    ResponderExcluir
  152. Temos salmonela até em alface.
    Tudo o que toca o chão está suscetível, pq lá estão os coliformes, ou na água que irriga e que escorre e blablablablablabalbala

    ResponderExcluir
  153. gente.. alguem sabe me dizer se glicemia em jejum de 8 horas de 86 é bom, ruim, péssimo ?!?!?! Obrigada !!!

    ResponderExcluir
  154. Temos ácido no estômago, que mata tudo isso na maioria das vezes.


    2014-06-25 15:46 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  155. ótimo


    2014-06-25 17:28 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  156. Caros colegas PLCHF, podem me indicar link de algum post ou site que contenha estudos dessa dieta em pacientes com cancer e em ex-pacientes?

    ResponderExcluir
  157. Aline Keila Castro25 de junho de 2014 20:49

    Boa noite Patricia, pode me esclarecer algumas dúvidas?
    Estou na LCHF ha uns 50 dias, com baixa ingesta de carbos (menos que 50g/dia), achei que perderia mais peso, mas ja me encontro num plato, li (acho que no paleodiario) que talvez um aumento de carbs para 100 a 150g / dia poderia ser benefico em mulheres. Pensei em usar a mandioca (100g tem 30g de carbo, ok?) em uma refeiçao junto com HIGH FAT, e outros carbs vindo de outros legumes permitidos (brocolis, couve flor, tomate, pepino, pimentões...) .
    De frutas, consumo as vermelhas e esporadicamente uso bananas não tão maduras (3 unidades, que consumo em 3 dias em uma receita de bolo LCHF com oleo de coco, farinha de amendoas, ovos, whey protein).
    Estou com muito receio em adicionar a mandioca , por isso gostaria que me ajudasse...
    Fiz uma lista com os principais tuberculos (mandioca, batata doce, inhame, abobora cabotiã, abobora japonesa, babata baroa, batata inglesa...) e algumas frutas (com baixo IG) contendo os valores de carbs/100g , para que eu possa ter um controle para que não passe de 100g carbs/dia .
    Posso usar esses tuberculos em receitas LCHF , tipo purês com manteiga, azeite, bancon, queijos (claro, que respeitando a quantidade de carbs)?
    Mil perdões por tantas dúvidas, mas tenho medo de colocar tudo a perder... acho que virei CARBOFÓBICA rsrsrsrsrs... mas cheguei a conclusão que talvez o consumo em torno de 50g/dia pra mim não seja tão eficaz, apesar de eu estar COMPLETAMENTE ADAPTADA e em CETOSE (uso aquelas fitas que medem na urina, apesar de saber que não são tão fidedignas).
    Gostaria muito de perder mais peso.
    Tenho 35 anos, 1.56, 55kg (perdi 6kg até agora) .
    Aguardo ansiosa a resposta !Obrigado !

    ResponderExcluir
  158. Aline Keila Castro25 de junho de 2014 20:56

    Boa noite,
    vou confessar uma coisa: prefiro comer a massa crua do seu bolinho cetogênico do que depois de assado no microondas ! kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

    ResponderExcluir
  159. http://www.cavemandoctor.com/category/cancer/

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 25/06/2014 20:38, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  160. Para aquelas pessoas que fazem o seguinte: Come biscoitos (seja cream cracker, recheado), miojo, pães brancos, doces, mas na hora que vê ovo cozido joga a gema fora, prefere margarina do que manteiga, evita carnes vermelhas, queijos gordurosos, bacon, torresmo e tudo isso com medo de ter problemas cardíacos ou então acaba engordando, lá vai um aviso: Sabem de nada inocentes! hehehe

    Mas posso ser sincero? Eu confesso que antigamente eu fazia isso, afinal pensava que carboidratos densos eram bem mais saudáveis do que gorduras saturadas.

    ResponderExcluir
  161. Eu também

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 26/06/2014 00:00, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  162. Doutor.... stevia pode ser utilizado para substituir o açúcar? Li que a stevia não eleva a insulina no organismo... quando falo na stevia me refiro a ela pura.. in natura mesmo..folhas secas e trituradas... nada de adoçante a base de stevia

    ResponderExcluir
  163. Eu também fazia.
    Não faço mais desde novembro de 2011, graças ao Dr. Souto.

    ResponderExcluir
  164. Não complementei meu pensamento: tirando o extremismo, não me preocupo demais não. Mas prefiro ainda qq comida feita em casa.

    ResponderExcluir
  165. nossa, que bom !! .. Obrigada Doutor.

    ResponderExcluir
  166. Pode

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 26/06/2014 02:06, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  167. E aí vai meu enésimo obrigado!

    ResponderExcluir
  168. Dr. Souto, ja viu isso !?
    http://g1.globo.com/mundo/noticia/2011/03/vegans-franceses-sao-acusados-de-homicidio-apos-morte-de-filha-por-desnutricao.html
    O que acha !?

    Existem evidencias que demonstre que uma alimentação vegana não é para crianças, ou mães amantando !?

    ResponderExcluir
  169. Eur J Pediatr. 2011 Dec;170(12):1489-94. doi: 10.1007/s00431-011-1547-x. Epub 2011 Sep 13. Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition.
    Van Winckel M 1, Vande Velde S , De Bruyne R , Van Biervliet S .
    Author information Abstract

    The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for youngchildren. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies.
    PMID: 21912895 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    2014-06-26 16:54 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  170. Alexandre de Oliveira26 de junho de 2014 17:10

    a coisa anda muito extremista, xiita. todo extremo da merda.

    ResponderExcluir
  171. Dr. Souto, o que tu acha do Picolinato de Cromo?

    ResponderExcluir
  172. Dr Souto:


    Pedirei meus primeiros exames de sangue após 7 meses de dieta, estou pensando nos seguintes: Glicemia de Jejum; Hemoglobina Glicada; Perfil Lipídico (HDL,LDL,VLDL e triglicerídeos), Homocisteína; Vitamina D; Proteína C-Reativa; Insulina de Jejum; Ácido Úrico; Uréia e Creatinina.


    Possuo síndrome de Wolff Parkinson White, só fiz eletrocardiograma há 5 anos atrás onde foi detectado e fiz mais exames constatando que não tenho sintomas. Nesse caso há algum outro exame a se pedir também?


    Obrigado!

    ResponderExcluir
  173. Provavelmente desnecessário

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 26/06/2014 20:51, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  174. Jairo, quanto ao problema de condução cardíaca, melhor se assessorar de um cardiologista. A lista de exames está bem.

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 26/06/2014 22:25, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  175. 1) Low carb não provoca hipercolesterolomia na maioria das pessoas (especialmente se não for ultra-high-fat)
    2) Colesterol não tem nada a ver com esse distúrbio de condução elétrica do coração.


    Em 27 de junho de 2014 09:21, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  176. eu li en algum lugar que nao mi lembro,que dis que quando vc começa a fazer a dieta paleo,LCHF no começo talves aumente sim o colesterol e muito,porque seu corpo nao esta acostumado com tanta gordura na dieta,depois de um tempo ele normaliza sosinho quando se acustumar com a nova dieta.e verdade doutor solto ?

    ResponderExcluir
  177. http://authoritynutrition.com/low-carb-diets-and-cholesterol/

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 27/06/2014 12:31, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  178. Mauricio Chaplin Schramm27 de junho de 2014 13:30

    Acabei de ler um artigo do doutor David Katz que me deixou um pouco curioso:


    Study: Saturated Fat as Bad as Sugar!

    Segue o link:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-katz-md/study-saturated-fat-as-ba_b_5507184.html

    ResponderExcluir
  179. O Katz não é burro, só vou te dizer isso. Basicamente ele quer dizer que apenas pelo fato de que low fat não é bom, não significa que high fat seja o ideal. Mas eu vejo LCHF cetogênico como um biohacking para perda de peso e TRATAMENTO de síndrome metabólica. A dieta ideal, na minha opinião, é páleo/primal. Olha o que ele diz:

    "Yes, I argue that should be "mostly plants," because
    the evidence argues that way -- not because I own stock in Brussels sprouts. A Paleo style diet that derives 50 percent of its calories from game is still "mostly plants" by volume, and a legitimate variation on the theme for those inclined to go that way."

    Eu CONCORDO com o parágrafo acima, e a minha dieta é, de fato, mais de 50% plantas em VOLUME (chego a comer 2 pratos cheios de salada antes do meu bife com ovos, e minha janta ontem foi abacate).

    Souto


    2014-06-27 13:30 GMT-03:00 Disqus :

    ResponderExcluir
  180. Prezado Dr Souto fui à um endocrinologista famoso aqui em Aracaju há 6 anos que me falou sobre essa dieta. Pensei que ele era maluco. Fez explicações sobre resistência à insulina, e que as gorduras não eram ruins. Não fiz nada do que ele disseComo vi resultados num amigo meu que está com ele voltei há 1 mês pra ele e me solicitou exames e me falou a mesma coisa. Recomendou seu site e me explicou que a saída da obesidade é por aí. Desde então não consigo desgrudar daqui. Muita explicação, muito artigo. Só não entendi o porque do nome dele não está aqui pois ele defende esse estilo há anos, inclusive com entrevistas na tv local. O nome dele é Amos. De qualquer maneira estou seguindo a dieta e experimentando uma nova vida, sem igual. Obrigado por ajudarem a pessoas vítimas dos carboidratos e má ciência como nos. Cordial abraço.

    ResponderExcluir
  181. Que legal!

    O nome dele não está aqui porque ele não me pediu - e eu não posso colocar o nome de ninguém sem autorização, certo? Mas, por favor, fale com ele - eu faria questão de colocá-lo na lista.


    Em 27 de junho de 2014 17:42, Disqus escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  182. doutor solto meu vizinho aqui da rua,que fas academia comigo,tamben entrou nesso modo de vida paleo LCHF
    ele ta fazendo para hipertrofia,mas por questões financeiras ele ta comendo so abacate alface e ovo,e de ves en quando frango,ele gostaria de saber se ele pode ficar so com esses alimentos,ou o senhor recomenda ele comer outras coisas?

    ResponderExcluir
  183. Agora no globo reporter sobre Panama e Costa Rica, a população mais longeva do mundo, na costa rica, sete vezes mais que os japoneses, começa mostrando uma senhora fritando torresmo e banana verde na banha, uma outra descascando inhame. A reporter diz que a glicose e colesterol dessa população estão em níveis normais...o motivo.....suspense...."provavelmente porque eles não fumam" ???????????? :-(

    ResponderExcluir
  184. :-)

    Lembrando que o fumo era um hábito indígena das Américas, que os europeus apenas copiaram no final de 1500. É vai me convencer de que esse povo não fuma??

    Eastern North American tribes would carry large amounts of tobacco in pouches as a readily accepted trade item and would often smoke it in pipes , either in sacred ceremonies or to seal bargains.[19] Adults as well as children enjoyed the practice.[20] It was believed that tobacco was a gift from the Creator and that the exhaled tobacco smoke was capable of carrying one's thoughts and prayers to heaven. [21]

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 28/06/2014 00:06, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  185. Olá José,


    penso que seria sensato incluir mais verduras e outras carnes. Miúdos, fígado, moela, coração, são baratos e completos em termos nutricionais.

    ResponderExcluir
  186. ok patricia vou avisar a ele

    ResponderExcluir
  187. outra pergunta andei pesquisando aqui na feira do meu bairro o cara disse que a manteiga de garrafa do sertão e a mesma coisa da manteiga ghee ? e verdade isso ?

    ResponderExcluir
  188. É

    Sent from mobile phone
    Em 28/06/2014 08:22, "Disqus" escreveu:

    ResponderExcluir
  189. e verdade opa entao eu vou comprar a do sertão porque eu sou de natal aqui do nordeste i ten pra vender en todo canto,e a manteiga ghee da um pouco de trabalho pra fazer e tal.obrigado doutor

    ResponderExcluir
  190. Uma das coisas que mais gosto no Dr. Souto é sua honestidade intelectual , ele nunca disse que essa dieta vai funcionar com todos. Provavelmente nada nessa vida funciona sempre, e nem com todo mundo.
    Ele não obriga ninguém vir aqui, ele não vende acesso ao conteúdo que escreve.
    E tudo que ele expõe, não é mera especulação ou achismo, a grande maioria dos estudos aqui presentes são oriundos de intervenções clinicas, estudos aonde a relação de causa x efeito está ali presente.

    Inclusive abre espaço para criticas , desde que essas sejam no mesmo molde, com alguma base cientifica, e não mero achismo.
    Mas veja, só porque essa dieta não funcionou com você, precisa jogar toda essa frustração e achar que ela não funciona com ninguém !?
    Eu perdi 40kg(120->80) , em um curto espaço de tempo( menos de 1 ano, sendo que perdi 27kg em 4 meses sem exercícios físicos, só depois eu os introduzi), e sou eternamente grato, porem veja, eu sou uma pessoa de 22 anos, e que provavelmente tenho grande facilidade de me tornar resistente a insulina, essa dieta, principalmente em versões mais cetogênicas foi feita sobre medida para pessoas com o meu quadro clinico. Possuíam obesidade, resistência a insulina acentuada porem não diabética e não houve ainda grande dano metabólico principalmente permanente.
    Mas veja, nem todo o obeso é resistente a insulina, nem todo mundo tem esse quadro, e esse estudo clinico, mesmo que feito com uma quantidade um pouco reduzida de pessoas e apesar da dieta de baixos carboidratos não ser reeeeeaalmente baixa, demonstra essa correlação :

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1038/oby.2005.79


    Veja, quando você isola as pessoas obesas em , Resistentes ou sensíveis a insulina em grupos e aplica dietas, você vê que ambas na tanto HC quando LC perderam a mesma quantidade media de peso, inclusive obesos sensíveis a insulina perdem mais peso com HC.

    http://i.imgur.com/h2tQSMW.gif

    Porem , numa maneira geral, grande parte dos obesos , provavelmente é resistente a insulina, mas isso não significa que você é. Porem tudo isso ainda te serviu para adquirir conhecimento, porque muitas coisas , mesmo que exista toneladas de estudos que demonstre relativamente benefícios de determinadas intervenções , existem pacientes que simplesmente não respondem a ela.
    Isso demonstra que seu corpo trabalha para ele, e não no que você acredita ou como quer que ele trabalhe, e como próprio Dr. Souto disse uma vez, suas tecidos receptores são surdos, mudos , cegos e burros, mas você não, e uma hora vai conseguir achar uma intervenção que funcione para você, mas até lá não precisa desse xingamento todo, porque afinal, garanto que essa dieta não te fez engordar, não te fez mal e ninguém ta te obrigando a segui-la.

    ResponderExcluir